Ride Sharing Powerhouse Uber Hits the News Again


On November 21st, the famous ride-sharing company, Uber, recognized a data breach that exposed the private information of over 57 million consumers. Beyond that, the violation also included the driver’s license numbers belonging to over 600,000 American Uber drivers. What’s even more shocking, is that instead of reporting the data breach, Uber paid the hackers a reported $100,000 to keep quiet, and relinquish the data.

Uber is reassuring its client base that the hacked information didn’t include any financial information such as bank accounts, credit card numbers, dates of birth or social security numbers, but a breach is a breach. Uber is also stating that the breach didn’t include any trip location history, so addresses have been kept private. Any time that private information is leaked to people with ill motives, there is a risk. Scammers have the capabilities of using names, email addresses, and other personal information to steal identities or perform fraudulent activities.

The previous security chief of Uber, Joe Sullivan, along with a subordinate who was also involved with paying off the hackers, have been dismissed from the company, Uber is assuring. However, it’s not the first time that an Uber employee has been terminated, or stepped down due to a series of scandals. In June of 2017, founder and once CEO, Travis Kalanick stepped down from the company. The board of directors hosted a change that kept equal voting regardless of the number of shares that one had, which closed the door on Kalanick ever returning as CEO.

The acknowledgment of the breach comes just shy of the holiday seasons where phishing and cybercriminal activity is at its highest point. Cybercriminals use shipping notifications and often send out emails pertaining to charitable donations in an attempt to obtain private information. Regardless of advances in technology, phone scams are still extremely prevalent and become much more efficient when the scammers know your name and address.

What do you think of the Uber information breach? How do you feel about them trying to cover it up instead of reporting it when it happened?


What Do You Think?

Ride Sharing Powerhouse Uber Hits the News Again

log in

reset password

Back to
log in
error: Alert: Content is protected !!